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Future Crimes – Book Review

FutureCrimeAuthor: Marc Goodman
Publisher: Doubleday, Random House LLC, NY, NY
Copyright: 2015, ISBN: 0385539012
Cover: Pet Garceau, PixelEmbargo (copyright)
Reviewed by: Lynard Barnes, January 15, 2016

Summary: Security on the internet is doomed, all internet transactions are doomed, we are all doomed. In the immortal words of CEO Parker Posey in the 2001 movie, Josie and the Pussycats, when all is doomed, “let’s have ice cream”.

Imagine you are living in single story house. Your front door is facing New York’s Times Square. On New Year’s eve you leave the house, leaving the front door open, to shop, visit family and friends, to work. You leave your front door open because you do not have a front door. The folks who built the house did not build the house with doors. This, essentially, is author Marc Goodman’s take on the internet. Expectations of privacy and security are a delightful delusion promulgated by profound ignorance.

Goodman’s approach in FUTURE CRIMES to address the sea of blissful, wide-eye acceptance of our growing technological dependence is to go over the current bad players and the opportunities for bad players in the future.
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Saturn Run – Book Comment

SaturnRun_BOOKCOMMENT_6Jan2016Author: John Sandford and Ctein
Publisher: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, Penguin Random House LLC
Copyright: 2015, ISBN: 0399176951
Cover: Tal Goretsky, (Planet) Da-Kuk
Reviewed by: Lynard Barnes, January 6, 2016

Summary: Space race between a futuristic United States and China to find out what a mysterious object was doing among the moons of Saturn. Modern day Shakespearian tragedy at its best.

Someone once said that science fiction is the improbably made possible. Or something like that. In any event, vampires and zombies are not in the least related to science fiction. Shoot-em up galactic adventures are more wild-west fantasy than science fiction. Science fiction requires the thoughtfulness of a Ray Bradbury or Isaac Asimov or Andy Weir or a host of other deep thinkers, including the authors of SATURN RUN. It is an incredible work of old, cemented-in-logic science fiction.

The story of this novel flows so smoothly that you overlook the improbabilities and simply follow the logic. The first hurdle is getting past the second chapter. It has a taste of THE HITCHHIKER’S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY by Douglas Adams. The character we meet in chapter two, Fletcher, only becomes interesting after he receives a visit from Mr. Crow, another interesting character. The story then unfolds into a plethora of complex characters who would simply be mundane characters doing their jobs if the circumstances were mundane. Of course the circumstances are not mundane. There is a mysterious craft seen leaving the orbit of Saturn.

Once upon a time it may have required only a Jules Verne imagination and Mark Twain writing skill to put together a good science fiction tale. Those days are over. Science fiction like SATURN RUN and Andy Weir’s THE MARTIAN are science fiction at its best–informative and entertaining.

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Dark Rivers of the Heart – Book Comment

DarkRiversoftheHeartAuthor: Dean Koontz
Publisher: Bantam Books Mass Market, Random House, Inc
Copyright: 1994, ISBN: 0345533036
Type: Fiction, paperback
Reviewed by: Lynard Barnes, January 6, 2016

Summary: A mystery with multiple layers ending in an expected place. The journey to get there however is one of the best of Koontz’s narratives.

Being an armchair historian, one of the reasons I read fiction is to see how much “real life” intrudes into fictional narratives. Sometimes, vice-versus–but rarely. Koontz’s DARK RIVERS OF THE HEART, published in 2004, is amazing in how much it captures the social and political sentiments of our current times.

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1421: The Year China Discovered America – Book Review

TheYearChinaDiscoveredAmericAuthor: Gavin Menzies
Publisher: William Morrow HarperCollins Publishers Inc, 10 East 53rd Street, NY, NY 10022
Copyright: 2002
Cover: Richard L. Aquan, Burstein Collection/CORBIS
Reviewed by: Lynard Barnes, January 7, 2016

Summary: An information filled, fun journey through fifteenth century maybe world history focusing on a two year period in China. An extraordinarily good book that balances facts with speculation.

In reading the title of this book you might well ask who didn’t discover America. After reading Gavin Menzies’ 553 page, 1421, you realize that discovery is not the issue. After all, there were countless native Indian tribes who discovered America every day for thousands of years before Europeans ever set foot on the place. If nothing else, Menzies’ book conclusively demonstrates that much of what passes as common-knowledge history is so full of gapping holes that you can drive an alien spacecraft through it with very little fear of hitting a fact. Eric Von Daniken and like minded “history researchers” have been doing just that.

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